CDC: Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance

Apart from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Surveys (NISVS) CDC also performs at regular intervals a survey among high school students called “Youth Risk Behaviour Surveillance” and has done so since the 1990s.

 

In 2001 they added the question

Have you ever been physically forced to have sexual intercourse when you did not want to?

to the survey.

 

Below is a chart showing the results of that questions since 2001 and up to the latest available data which is from 2015:

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Bias And Unasked Questions

STIRitUP is a 24 month collaborative research project looking at interpersonal violence and abuse in young people’s relationships. The project is based in five European countries: England, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Italy and Norway. STIR is short for Safeguarding Teenage Intimate Relationships.

The project has conducted a survey among 4,500 pupils in these five countries. STIRitUp has published the results of that survey in the Briefing paper 2. This paper presents the survey’s main findings in table 2 — here is an excerpt of that table (only looking at physical and sexual violence):

Gender and incidence rates for experiencing IPVA

Country Gender Physical % Sexual %
Bulgaria Female 11 21
Male 15 25
Cyprus Female 10 17
Male 9 19
England Female 22 41
Male 12 14
Italy Female 9 35
Male 13 39
Norway Female 18 28
Male 8 9

Discrepancies

First I’ll just point out the discrepancies between the findings presented in the table and how they’re presented in the text.
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South Africa: Rape and partner violence among youths

South Africa is said to be the worlds rape capital according to a report published in 2012 by the Institute for Security Studies (ISS) think-tank. That report only looked at female victims of rape. Searching Google News one quickly sees that sexual violence and rape in South Africa is prevalent and has been for quite some time. One also note that women and girls are the most common victims mentioned – although rape against young male children are also mentioned. Perpetrators are always male. So the impression one is left with is: Women and girls (but also some boys) are raped by male perpetrators in disturbingly high numbers.

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NISVS 2010 on Domestic Violence – what was left out and is it important?

This is a comment I left over at Ally Fogg’s blog in September:

One really ought to read the complete NISVS 2010 Report rather than quoting from it’s executive summary as there are certain omissions there. The finding that there is a parity between the number of women reporting rape and attempted rape and men reporting being made to penetrate or an attempt at such in the last 12 months are one such omission – due to space constraints according to CDC themselves.

Another one is regarding DV, or more specifically psychological aggression which includes expressive aggression and coercive control, as stated on page 10 in the report:

Psychological aggression, including expressive aggression and coercive
control, is an important component of intimate partner violence. Although research suggests that psychological aggression may be even more harmful than physical violence by an intimate partner (Follingstad, Rutledge, Berg, Hause, & Polek, 1990), there is little agreement about how to determine when psychologically aggressive behavior becomes abusive and can be classified as intimate partner violence. Because of the lack of consensus in the field at the time of this report, the prevalence of psychologically aggressive behaviors is reported, but is not included in the overall prevalence estimates of intimate partner violence.

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