NISVS 2010 on Domestic Violence – what was left out and is it important?

This is a comment I left over at Ally Fogg’s blog in September:

One really ought to read the complete NISVS 2010 Report rather than quoting from it’s executive summary as there are certain omissions there. The finding that there is a parity between the number of women reporting rape and attempted rape and men reporting being made to penetrate or an attempt at such in the last 12 months are one such omission – due to space constraints according to CDC themselves.

Another one is regarding DV, or more specifically psychological aggression which includes expressive aggression and coercive control, as stated on page 10 in the report:

Psychological aggression, including expressive aggression and coercive
control, is an important component of intimate partner violence. Although research suggests that psychological aggression may be even more harmful than physical violence by an intimate partner (Follingstad, Rutledge, Berg, Hause, & Polek, 1990), there is little agreement about how to determine when psychologically aggressive behavior becomes abusive and can be classified as intimate partner violence. Because of the lack of consensus in the field at the time of this report, the prevalence of psychologically aggressive behaviors is reported, but is not included in the overall prevalence estimates of intimate partner violence.

Anyone willing to bet on the distribution of victims gender-wise of psychological aggression including expressive aggression and coercive control?

Let’s see for ourselves on table 4.9 and 4.10 page 46:

Lifetime numbers:
Any psychological aggression
Men: 48.8%
Women: 48.4%

Any expressive aggression:
Men: 31.9%
Women: 40.3%

Coercive control:
Men: 42.5 %
Women: 41.1 %

Last 12 months
Any psychological aggression
Men: 18.1 %
Women: 13.9 %

Any expressive aggression:
Men: 9.3 %
Women: 10.4 %

Coercive control:
Men: 15.2 %
Women: 10.7 %

On a discussion on BBC’s radio show “The Women’s Hour” where the issue brought up was male victims of DV in light of the fact that The Crime Survey for England and Wales 2011-12 indicating that more married men than married women reported experiencing partner abuse in the past year guests Dr Catherine Donovan of Sunderland University and Jane Keeper, Director of Operations at Refuge pointed out that coercive control was to be included as DV (of course their belief was that this was predominately something men did to their intimate partners) and stressed it’s importance.

If we look at physical violence by a partner we see that the lifetime numbers show
32.9% of women reporting that and 28.2% of men reporting that. When we look at the “12 months” figures the picture changes a bit: 4.0% of women and 4.7% of men report that. Numbers are from table 4.1. and 4.2 page 38.

 

 

3 thoughts on “NISVS 2010 on Domestic Violence – what was left out and is it important?

  1. Pingback: NISVS 2011 Released – Increased Male Victimization And Rape Is Still Not Rape | Tamen's writings
  2. Pingback: NISVS 2011 Released – Increased Male Victimization And Rape Is Still Not Rape (NoH) | Feminist Critics
  3. Pingback: NISVS 2011 released: Increased male victimization and rape is still not rape

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